Lexicon

– Phosphorescence
Phosphorescence is a specific type of photoluminescence related to fluorescence. Unlike fluorescence, a phosphorescent material does not immediately re-emit the radiation it absorbs. The slower time scales of the re-emission are associated with “forbidden” energy state transitions in quantum mechanics. As these transitions occur very slowly in certain materials, absorbed radiation may be re-emitted at a lower intensity for up to several hours after the original excitation.
(ref wikipedia)

Fluorescence
Fluorescence is the emission of light by a substance that has absorbed light or other electromagnetic radiation. It is a form of luminescence. In most cases, the emitted light has a longer wavelength, and therefore lower energy, than the absorbed radiation. The most striking example of fluorescence occurs when the absorbed radiation is in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum, and thus invisible to the human eye, while the emitted light is in the visible region, which gives the fluorescent substance a distinct color that can only be seen when exposed to UV light. Fluorescent materials cease to glow immediately when the radiation source stops, unlike phosphorescence, where it continues to emit light for some time after.
(ref wikipedia)

Black light paint
Black light paint or black light fluorescent paint is luminous paint that glows under a black light. It is based on pigments that respond to light in the ultraviolet segment of the electromagnetic spectrum. The paint may or may not be colorful under ordinary light. Black light paint should not be confused with phosphorescent (glow-in-the-dark) or daylight fluorescent paint.
(ref wikipedia)

Motion Capture

Motion capture (Mo-cap for short) is the process of recording the movement of objects or people. It is used in military, entertainment, sports, medical applications, and for validation of computer vision[2] and robotics. In filmmaking and video game development, it refers to recording actions of human actors, and using that information to animate digital charactermodels in 2D or 3D computer animation.[3][4][5] When it includes face and fingers or captures subtle expressions, it is often referred to as performance capture.[6] In many fields, motion capture is sometimes called motion tracking, but in filmmaking and games, motion tracking usually refers more to match moving.(ref wikipedia)

Avatar

Avatar (marketed as James Cameron’s Avatar) is a 2009 American[7][8] epic science fiction filmdirected, written, produced, and co-edited by James Cameron, and starring Sam Worthington, Zoe Saldana, Stephen Lang, Michelle Rodriguez, and Sigourney Weaver. The film is set in the mid-22nd century, when humans are colonizing Pandora, a lush habitable moon of a gas giant in the Alpha Centauri star system, in order to mine the mineral unobtanium,[9][10] a room-temperature superconductor.[11] The expansion of the mining colony threatens the continued existence of a local tribe of Na’vi – a humanoid species indigenous to Pandora. The film’s title refers to a genetically engineered Na’vi body with the mind of a remotely located human that is used to interact with the natives of Pandora.(ref wikipedia)-

Virtual World

A virtual world or massively multiplayer online world (MMOW) is a computer-based simulated environment[1] populated by many users who can create a personal avatar, and simultaneously and independently explore the virtual world, participate in its activities and communicate with others.[2] These avatars can be textual, two or three-dimensional graphical representations, or live video avatars with auditory and touch sensations.[3][4] In general, virtual worlds allow for multiple users(ref wikipedia)

SNS

A social networking service (also social networking site, SNS or social media) is an online platform that is used by people to build social networks or social relations with other people who share similar personal or career interests, activities, backgrounds or real-life connections. The variety of stand-alone and built-in social networking services currently available in the online space introduces challenges of definition; however, there are some common features:[1] (1) social networking services are Web 2.0 internet-based applications,[1][2] (2) user-generated content (UGC) is the lifeblood of SNS organisms,[1][2] (3) users create service-specific profiles for the site or app that are designed and maintained by the SNS organization,[1][3] and (4) social networking services facilitate the development of online social networks by connecting a user’s profile with those of other individuals and/or groups.[1][3] Most social network services are web-based and provide means for users to interact over the Internet, such as by e-mail and instant messaging and online forums.

-High Technology

High technology, often abbreviated to high tech (adjective forms high-technology, high-tech or hi-tech) is technology that is at the cutting edge: the most advanced technology available.As of the onset of the 21st century, products considered high tech are often those that incorporate advanced computer electronics. However, there is no specific class of technology that is high tech—the definition shifts and evolves over time—so products hyped as high-tech in the past may now be considered to be everyday or outdated technology.The opposite of high tech is low technology, referring to simple, often traditional or mechanical technology; for example, a calculator is a low-tech calculating device.

E-textiles

E-textiles, also known as smart garments, smart clothing, electronic textiles, smart textiles, or smart fabrics, are fabrics that enable digital components (including small computers), and electronics to be embedded in them. Smart textiles are fabrics that have been developed with new technologies that provide added value to the wearer. Pailes-Friedman of the Pratt Institute states that “what makes smart fabrics revolutionary is that they have the ability to do many things that traditional fabrics cannot, including communicate, transform, conduct energy and even grow”

Wearable technology

Wearable technology, wearables, fashionable technology, wearable devices, tech togs, or fashion electronics are clothing and accessories incorporating computer and advanced electronic technologies. The designs often incorporate practical functions and features.[1]Wearable devices such as activity trackers are a good example of the Internet of Things, since they are part of the network of physical objects or “things” embedded with electronics, software, sensors and connectivity to enable objects to exchange data with a manufacturer, operator and/or other connected devices, without requiring human intervention.

Wearable computers

Wearable computers, also known as body-borne computers or wearables are miniature electronic devices that are worn under, with or on top of clothing.[1] This class of wearable technology has been developed for general or special purpose information technologies. It is also used in media development. Wearable computers are especially useful for applications that require more complex computational support, such as accelerometers or gyroscopes, than just hardware coded logic.